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Monday, November 14, 2022

Apostate Bishops Have Their Unholy Synod, Will Faithful Bishops Call an Imperfect Council?

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Apostate Bishops Have Their Unholy Synod, Will Faithful Bishops Call an Imperfect Council?

In his 2018 article in The Remnant, Can the Church Defend Herself Against Bergoglio?, Christoper Ferrara presented the case for bishops to call an imperfect council to remove Bergoglio:

 

“So what can be done to defend the Church against Bergoglio?  That the mode of papal election by cardinals has persisted for nearly a thousand years has led to the general impression that it pertains to the irreformable divine constitution of the Church, but it certainly does not.  As to matters of purely ecclesiastical law such as this one the Church has always allowed for departures from traditional practice in cases of emergency or grave necessity. And just as a synod was employed to address three rival claimants to the papal throne in 1046, declaring at least two of them deposed, so today might it be possible for reform-minded cardinals and bishops, comprising an imperfect council, to undo the incalculable damage caused by the cabal that lobbied for Bergoglio’s election before the last conclave—a cabal that included none other than McCarrick, whom Bergoglio rewarded by rehabilitating that monster despite the massive evidence of his unspeakable crimes.”

As Mr. Ferrara discussed, an imperfect council could address either, or both, of the common grounds for arguing that Bergoglio has lost or never possessed the papacy: because he was not validly elected, or because he has fallen into heresy. As part of its scope, an imperfect council could consider the status of Benedict XVI as well. We who are not bishops do not need to resolve these questions — if faithful bishops gather to discern God’s will in these matters, we can have confidence that God will give them the grace to guide the Church.

The theoretical question of whether bishops can ever call an imperfect council to depose a pope does not depend on historical circumstances — they either can or they cannot, and Mr. Ferrara’s article cites various Catholic authorities in support of the imperfect council as a legitimate option.

There has never been a more compelling case for extraordinary episcopal action than what we face now with Bergoglio.

However, the relevant historical circumstances naturally play a crucial role in determining whether, and to what extent, it would be prudent for bishops to oppose a man reputed to be pope. Cajetan and others contemplated the case of a pope who had fallen into heresy; today we face a situation in which the reputed pope not only promotes numerous baneful heresies but also strives to undermine the entire philosophical and theological basis for objective truth.

In the past four years, scarcely a month has gone by without Bergoglio taking some action that makes it more necessary for bishops to take action. And, as we can see from the following considerations, the increased need to call an imperfect council has corresponded with a diminution of the potential risks associated with such an action. There has never been a more compelling case for extraordinary episcopal action than what we face now with Bergoglio.

The Scandal of Inaction. Several bishops have defended the Church against Bergoglio’s unholy attacks over the past four years, and faithful Catholics have applauded those efforts. At a certain point, though, mere denunciations of Bergoglio, without meaningful actions, perpetuate the belief that the Church is helpless to defend itself against a destroyer. This demoralizes and scandalizes not only Catholics but also those who would consider entering the Church. We yearn for saintly bishops, who would risk martyrdom or excommunication to cooperate with God’s grace in defense of the Church. We expect that those bishops who truly understand the gravity of today’s crisis will do what they can to remove Bergoglio — the ongoing failure to do so does not simply perpetuate the crisis, it adds a serious component to it.

Worsening Crisis. In 2018, the crisis was already great enough for lead Mr. Ferrara to write that the bishops would have to act soon or God would:

“[B]arring Bergoglio’s conversion and reversal of course, the Church cannot abide this pontificate any longer. One way or another, the Church will have to repel an attacker at her very summit. Either the human element of the Church will act according to the means which seem possible, however extraordinary, or Heaven itself will intervene in a manner that might well involve a divine chastisement due to the negligence of time-serving pastors who left their sheep completely undefended against the wolves who preyed upon them, including the wolf the cardinals improvidently elected Pope."

Bishops have not acted, and it seems that their negligence is itself a type of divine chastisement. The Church suffers more than ever before because there is nobody to offer effective resistance to Bergoglio.

Whereas four years ago many Catholics saw Bergoglio merely as a bad pope, a growing number now realize that he is intentionally doing as much damage as possible to the Church.

Since Bergoglio introduced his blasphemous Pachamama in October 2019, he has assumed a far more open and intense role in destroying the Church. Stepping back, if all we knew about the Catholic Church was what we see from Bergoglio and his collaborators today, what would we surmise to be the mission of the Church? Objective observers could reasonably conclude that the Church exists to attack Christianity, advance the Great Reset, and otherwise promote moral idiocy. Every day that Bergoglio has to destroy the Church further insults God, causes more harm to souls, and reinforces this blasphemous view of the Church.

At this point, no reasonable observer can honestly believe that matters will improve without extraordinary intervention, either from God or from the remaining faithful bishops who cooperate with God’s grace to do all they can to oppose Bergoglio.

Separation of Catholic Church and Synodal Church. God can draw good out of evil, and it seems that the worsening crisis has yielded at least two positive fruits: some souls have realized that they must turn to God with fervor, and many others have chosen sides in the spiritual and theological battle that began to dominate the Church at Vatican II.

This latter point makes it much more likely that an imperfect council could succeed. Whereas four years ago many Catholics saw Bergoglio merely as a bad pope, a growing number now realize that he is intentionally doing as much damage as possible to the Church. Moreover, many more Catholics, including bishops, now realize that the crisis began with Vatican II. This means that more of those bishops who could potentially gather to take action against Bergoglio understand that the Church must return to what the Church has always taught and practiced.

We already have a de facto separation of Bergoglio’s “Synodal Church,” which thrives on anti-Catholic innovation, from the Catholic Church, which safeguards the immutable Catholic Faith.

For all practical purposes, we already have a de facto separation of Bergoglio’s “Synodal Church,” which thrives on anti-Catholic innovation, from the Catholic Church, which safeguards the immutable Catholic Faith. This reality, paired with the perceived need to recognize Bergoglio as pope, fosters a crippling cognitive dissonance and contributes to widespread apostasy. Formally expelling Bergoglio from the Church would hamper his ability to destroy it and help restore the necessary alignment of the Catholic hierarchy with immutable Catholic truth.

Bergoglio and his fellow apostates might continue to call themselves Catholics for a time, but true Catholics would no longer need to defend the Church by explaining that we have a pope who is not Catholic. The Church would almost certainly be smaller, but the world would once again see it as One, Holy, Catholic, and Apostolic, for the first time since Vatican II.

How Many Faithful Bishops? The prospect of any episcopal action to address the crisis — especially an imperfect council — necessarily involves the question of which bishops would participate. Given the nature of the crisis, it would be nonsensical and counterproductive to involve those bishops who have clearly abandoned the Catholic Faith.

How do we know which bishops have lost the Faith? Any bishops who support the Synod on Synodality, approve of Traditionis Custodes, believe that God positively wills non-Catholic religions, or think that people in a state of mortal sin can receive Communion do not have the Catholic Faith. Such men are confused at best; many of them are malicious frauds.

Ideally, those faithful bishops who have heroically defended the Faith against Bergoglio’s assaults could attract many other bishops to take action to address the current crisis. But the truth does not depend upon numbers and any bishop who does not want to do all he can to resolve the current crisis is not worthy of his vocation. Thanks to Bergoglio’s maniacal assaults on the Church, we likely have as many bishops as we will ever have who realize that they must act. How many bishops are needed? As many as are willing to serve God faithfully at this most dangerous time in Church history.

Even if we had never heard of an imperfect council, we could derive the need for faithful bishops to gather together in an attempt to discern God’s will to defend the Church against Bergoglio.

Possible Episcopal Action. Even if we had never heard of an imperfect council, we could derive the need for faithful bishops to gather together in an attempt to discern God’s will to defend the Church against Bergoglio. God could solve the crisis without human actors, but faithful Catholics look to the successors of the Apostles as the ones who should manifest God’s will to lead the Church.

We can all hope and pray for what seems to be the most desirable outcome: many faithful bishops gather and prayerfully discern the need to depose Bergoglio; they then initiate the process to elect a holy pope, who promptly announces the imminent consecration of Russia to the Immaculate Heart of Mary; the newly elected Vicar of Christ then proceeds to lead as many souls as possible to Heaven.

But what if the bishops were to determine that it is not God’s will for them to remove Bergoglio? They could still rebuke Bergoglio, denounce the many errors fueling the Synodal Church, assure the faithful that they have a right and duty to resist those errors, clearly affirm the Church’s traditional teaching, and call all Catholics to prayer and penance, as requested by Our Lady of Fatima. If Bergoglio were to respond to this by excommunicating the faithful bishops from his unholy Synodal Church, Deo Gratias! They could then remove Bergoglio with great confidence.

Saintly Examples. At this moment in salvation history, it seems possible that we need a proliferation of great saints even more than we need resolution of the Bergoglio crisis. We need souls who will turn to God, doing all they can to serve Him, consistent with their duties of state. If the remaining faithful bishops gather to do all they can to resolve the crisis in the Church, they will give powerful witness to the fact that God wants us to strive to be saints, trusting Him enough to do His will without counting the costs. Emulating St. Boniface who chopped down Thor’s Oak Tree, the Church’s faithful bishops can demolish the Spirit of Vatican II and its disastrous fruits, including the Synodal Church. But to do this they must act as saints, willing to trade short term comforts for high places in Heaven.

It was the bishops at Vatican II who led the Church so deeply into this crisis and it would be fitting for faithful bishops to cooperate with God’s grace to lead the Church out of the crisis.

The Aftermath. If faithful bishops gather to discern God’s will, and truly cooperate with God’s grace to implement His will, we can be confident that any episcopal action will honor God and be beneficial for the Church. If they successfully remove Bergoglio, we would expect all hell to break loose, and the demons would do everything possible to attack the “purified" Church. But at least those demons would no longer find safe refuge in the Church.

It is reasonable to consider potential collateral damage of an imperfect council. What if certain Traditional Catholics cannot accept the turmoil and either leave the Church or remain with Bergoglio’s Synodal Church? What if that includes priests and bishops? What will happen to Church properties and finances? These considerations are important but secondary — it seems that the bishops would do well simply to cooperate with God’s grace to handle the matter of primary importance, which is addressing the fact that Bergoglio is using his power to destroy the Church.

God does not need the faithful bishops to take action — He can solve this crisis at any moment. Even so, it was the bishops at Vatican II who led the Church so deeply into this crisis and it would be fitting for faithful bishops to cooperate with God’s grace to lead the Church out of the crisis. May the Blessed Virgin Mary lead the faithful bishops to where they must go for the good of the Mystical Body of Christ, just as she brought St. John to the foot of the Cross. Immaculate Heart of Mary, pray for us!

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Last modified on Monday, November 14, 2022
Robert Morrison | Remnant Columnist

Robert Morrison is a Catholic, husband and father. He is the author of A Tale Told Softly: Shakespeare’s The Winter’s Tale and Hidden Catholic England.