FaceBook 48x48   Twitter 48x48   Feed 48x48

 
Monday, September 4, 2017

Good Nurse, Bad Cop: What America Can Learn from Miss Wubbles

Written by 
Rate this item
(18 votes)

America, as a nation, is becoming not only increasingly ungovernable but not easily policed, at least not since the Christian moral code—based on the Ten Commandments of God—has been effectively declared 'hate speech' by Leftist social engineers.

As we’re all finding out the hard way, once that code is gone we are asking our police to do the impossible—keep the peace in an immoral society that has rejected the law of God and imagines itself subject to no greater moral authority than that of their own ill-formed consciences.

"Who are you to tell me what to do?"-- actually makes sense if we as a society are not bound by the law of God. In that case, might makes right, and tyranny vs. lawlessness is what we can expect from here on out.
 
And so it is true that many police officers today seem to be reaching the breaking point (can we blame them?)  We've defended the police under fire in our cities before in these columns, and we'll do so again. But here's an example of a bad cop and why many Americans are finding it increasingly difficult to trust their own police. 

The incident took place when a police officer wanted a nurse to take blood from an unconscious man. When she hesitated to do so, out of concern for the law, as well as the polices agreed upon by both police and hospital administrators, the police officer "lost it" and arrested her.

Take a look:

 

Obviously, most cops are not lunatics like Detective Jeff Payne here. He's out of control and should be removed from the force. But he's not the reason we're posting this video. The nurse is!

Nurse Wubbles said at a news conference Thursday that she felt “betrayed,” “angry” and “confused,” and warned that she may consider taking legal action over the confrontation. 

However, in a statement to the press released Friday, Wubbels said she had accepted the “sincere apologies” of Police Chief Brown and Mayor Biskupski.

“I look forward to working with both of them to help promote further civil dialogue and education,” she said. “The common goal of all public service professionals should be to provide the best care to our fellow citizens.”

Remember when it wasn’t uncommon for Americans to react this way, even in the face of adversity and injustice?  When I was a kid, Nurse Wubbles’s reaction was commonplace. Today, it’s an anomaly.

Even after her horrific ordeal, Nurse Wubbles accepts the apology of the Police Chief, and then uses the assault against her to try to improve the common good of her community. It's not about revenge. It's not about playing the victim card (which she surely was). It's not about her.  It's about healing, forgiveness and the betterment of a troubled society— attitudes naturally based on a Christian understanding of the common good.

"I look forward to working... to help promote further civil dialogue and education.  The common goal of all public service professionals should be to provide the best care to our fellow citizens.”  Can you imagine if more Americans were this mature, insightful and constructive, even after undergoing such horrific injustice at the hands of law enforcement?  This woman is a role model.
 
I have no idea what religion Nurse Wubbles belongs to, but I'd be shocked if she's not a Christian. What this country needs are less people like Detective Jeff Payne and a lot more like Nurse Wubbles—a woman still in possession of the qualities and virtues that once made this country great.

I hope her example still resonates with most Americans. If not, well, God help us, because we surely will not be able to help ourselves much longer.

The Remnant Newspaper... you're missing a lot if you're not a subscriber.

[Comment Guidelines]
The Remnant values the comments and input of our visitors. It’s no secret, however, that trolls exist, and trolls can do a lot of damage to a brand. Therefore, our comments are heavily monitored 24/7 by Remnant moderators around the country.  They have been instructed to remove demeaning, hostile, needlessly combative, racist, Christophobic comments, and streams not related to the storyline. Multiple comments from one person under a story are also discouraged. Capitalized sentences or comments will be removed (Internet shouting).
The Remnant comments sections are not designed for frequent personal blogging, on-going debates or theological or other disputes between commenters. Please understand that we pay our writers to defend The Remnant’s editorial positions. We thus acknowledge no moral obligation whatsoever to allow anyone and everyone to try to undermine our editorial policy and create a general nuisance on our website.  Therefore, Remnant moderators reserve the right to edit or remove comments, and comments do not necessarily represent the views of The Remnant.
Read 2740 times Last modified on Monday, September 4, 2017
Michael Matt | Editor

Michael Matt has been an editor of The Remnant since 1990. Since 1994, he has been the newspaper's editor. A graduate of Christendom College, Michael Matt has written hundreds of articles on the state of the Church and the modern world. He is the host of The Remnant Underground and Remnant TV's The Remnant Forum. He's been U.S. Coordinator for Notre Dame de Chrétienté in Paris--the organization responsible for the Pentecost Pilgrimage to Chartres, France--since 2000.  Mr. Matt has led the U.S. contingent on the Pilgrimage to Chartres for the last 24 years. He is a lecturer for the Roman Forum's Summer Symposium in Gardone Riviera, Italy. He is the author of Christian Fables, Legends of Christmas and Gods of Wasteland (Fifty Years of Rock ‘n’ Roll) and regularly delivers addresses and conferences to Catholic groups about the Mass, home-schooling, and the culture question. Together with his wife, Carol Lynn and their seven children, Mr. Matt currently resides in St. Paul, Minnesota.

Support The Remnant Newspaper icon close x