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Wednesday, April 9, 2014

Joan of Arc: Scourge of Modern Feminists

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Joan of Arc cut her hair short and wore men’s clothes.  She particularly fancied beautiful armor and fine horses, which she rode astride, and was admired for her prowess with the lance.  She led troops into battle, remaining in armor for six days running if necessary, and never faltered in her objective even after the enemy captured her. They tried her and executed her, not for war crimes, but for being a witch.

We might expect to see her commemorated on a postage stamp or a silver dollar along with other intrepid females who fought for women’s rights or otherwise beat men at their own game. But feminists seem wary of Joan, as if they didn’t quite trust her.  Anyway, they don’t often mention her, at least in public, and they certainly don’t carry her banner in demonstrations. That shows a degree of political acumen on their part, for were they to call attention to her it would soon become painfully clear that she didn’t care a fig for equal rights, for either man or woman.

 

■ As one advocate for victims stated, “In his more than 25 years as the world’s most powerful religious figure, we can’t think of a single predatory priest or complicit bishop who experienced any consequences whatsoever for committing or concealing heinous child sex crimes.

Did you hear what one English writer, Jerome K. Jerome, said to the other English writer, Ford M. Ford?

“There’s something, old boy, which I’ve always abhorred: When people address me and call me, ‘Jerome’, Are they being standoffish, or too much at home?” Said Ford, “I agree; it’s the same thing with me.” There is something about reduplicated names that is not only repetitive but just a bit odd. I have an inherent distrust of those so named.

Peritus at Vatican II on What Really Happened

(Editor’s Note:  Monsignor Bandas was a member of two commissions during the Second Vatican Council, one on dogma and the other on seminaries. He attended every session of the Second Vatican Council, and he died on June 26, 1969. The founding editor of The Remnant, Walter L. Matt, a close friend of Msgr. Bandas, used to say that in a very real sense Vatican II brought on the early death of Msgr. Bandas—a brilliant, holy priest who died of a broken heart over the Council.  Msgr. Bandas, upon his return from Vatican II, predicted that, before all this was over, “the blood of faithful Catholics would flow in the sanctuaries.”  May the following inspiring and yet sobering words of the late, great Msgr. Bandas remain with us always, and may we never forget such fallen heroes of the old Faith. The following is reprinted from The Remnant, Feb. 12, 1968. MJM)

During the three years of His public ministry Our Lord rapidly attained an immense popularity.  Huge crowds hailed Him at every side, followed Him, pressed upon Him, so that on one occasion only through an opening in the roof could a paralytic be placed before Jesus. 

Page 80 of 87

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