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Thursday, January 19, 2023

“Pray for America”: Interview with Shukri Abdirahman

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“Pray for America”: Interview with Shukri Abdirahman

“Just Like You”

Shukri Abdirahman is an American patriot. She risked her life in the United States Army for the country she loves.

Abdirahman is now a veteran. And a single mother. Her children’s father, also a military veteran, was lost to his wife and children due to PTSD.

Abdirahman is also a survivor. She survived a car accident in 1994 when six illegals ran a red light. She spent six weeks in the hospital recovering. In December of 2022, she survived another car accident. Abdirahman was injured. One of her small children required more than a dozen stitches on the forehead.

In the midst of a host of troubles, she ran for Congress in 2022, hoping to wrest Minnesota’s Fifth Congressional District away from the socialist Ilhan Omar (D-MN).

Shukri Abdirahman is a survivor because she’s a fighter. She is indomitable. In the midst of a host of troubles, she ran for Congress in 2022, hoping to wrest Minnesota’s Fifth Congressional District away from the socialist Ilhan Omar (D-MN).

In her 2022 campaign ad, Shukri, who goes by “Shu,” declares that she is “just like you.”

Only, I’m betting there are ways in which Shu isn’t just like you at all. She’s not like me, at least, in that I never served in the military. I never ran for office. I never held a family together on my own. I never faced a loved one’s PTSD. I never bounced back from two car accidents. In all these ways, Shu is not just like me at all. She lives with a strength to which I can only aspire.

Shukri Abdirahman2Shukri Abdirahman

There’s one more way in which Shu is not like me. Shukri Abdirahman was born in Somalia. Her father, a former Minister of Agriculture in that country, was murdered by the Mohamed Siad Barre regime. After escaping from her homeland with her life, Abdirahman and her surviving family members spent years in a refugee camp in Kenya before finally being granted asylum in the United States.

Abdirahman is therefore an American by choice. She understands that what so many Americans take for granted are not guaranteed at all. She is a patriot who had to fight to become an American. Nothing in life was given to her. And for that reason Shukri Abdirahman is not about to let anything she loves be taken away.

In her strength and circumstances, Shu is nothing like me at all. She is someone I want to emulate if I can. She is an American to hold up and follow.

And now, two years into an illegitimate presidency and even deeper into a globalist power grab, this American has a simple message for her countrymen and -women: “Wake up.”

The Backpack

I first learned of Shu in late 2022. One of her tweets, about the so-called “election” that November, was picked up by major media outlets. The Fake News Media mocked Shu for her truth-telling about the FBI’s having thrown the previous “election,” in 2020, for the Democrats.

The Fake News Media mocking Shu said nothing, of course, about the coup which the FBI and CIA ran against Donald Trump, on Hillary Clinton’s behalf, beginning in 2016.

I saw in Shu’s words a heartfelt distress, a patriotic and sincere plea. I reached out to her and invited her to do an interview for The Remnant. She agreed.

Then, on a night in October 1988, while we were sleeping, our house was raided by the red hat forces. These were the dictator president’s elite forces, like Delta or Special Forces in the United States. “I recall my mother’s screams waking us kids up.”

Before our telephone interview in late December, Shu and I communicated via e-mail. She sent me a short biographical sketch. Short, but searing.

“When I was eight,” Shu wrote, “my dad gave me a green backpack he had used during his PhD studies at the University of Colorado.

“It had a map of the United States on the back, along with these words embroidered in white: ‘THE WILL OF THE PEOPLE’.

“When my dad gave me that backpack, I had never been to America. I didn’t speak a word of English. I was mesmerized as my dad explained what those five words meant. Now, I wonder if the will of the people even exists anymore.”

That backpack is one of a very few things that Shu now has which connect her to her father.

“My dad resigned as the Minister of Agriculture in Somalia right when I was born,” Shu continues. “He left the dictatorship government to get away to America. He took five of my siblings and my Mom with him to Fort Collins, Colorado.

“But the Somali government refused to issue me and my little brother passports. This was to spite my father for his having resigned from the regime.

“So, my little brother and I were both left behind in Somalia. My maternal grandmother moved from Ethiopia to keep us from being placed in one of the dictator Barre’s orphanages.

“Eventually, my mom and three of my siblings were made to come back to Somalia, having been denied asylum by the United States government. The reason they were denied asylum was that Somalia was not at war at the time, even though silent atrocities were being committed by the Barre regime.

“Soon after that,” Shu says, “my dad’s asylum application was also denied, and he returned to Somalia in September of 1988. My dad gifted me his school backpack and a copy of his PhD dissertation upon his return to Somalia.

I can still see so vividly the brutal ‘red hat’ thugs as they came for my father. I felt my heart being ripped out of my chest. Two days later, on October 21, 1988, my dad was buried.

“But he left my two oldest brothers behind in America with some American colleagues in the agricultural field. My two brothers were boys of seventeen and eighteen at the time, so my Dad feared for their lives.

“I was one of the top students in the country in science back then. I was going to go to Ethiopia to take part in a science competition for school. Then, on a night in October 1988, while we were sleeping, our house was raided by the red hat forces. These were the dictator president’s elite forces, like Delta or Special Forces in the United States.

“I recall my mother’s screams waking us kids up.”

“They Erased God”

Those screams were the beginning of a waking nightmare for Shu and her family.

“I can’t fully explain that night,” Shu tells me. “It’s something I memory-holed. But I will never forget, will never forget, the monstrosity of the terror. That night was the longest, most never-ending time in my existence.

“No one came out in our neighborhood to even dare see what all the screams were about,” Shu continues. “THE WILL OF THE PEOPLE had been stolen from them.”

In the isolation of a neighborhood paralyzed by fear, the Abdirahmans experienced a living Hell.

“I can still see so vividly the brutal ‘red hat’ thugs as they came for my father.

“I felt my heart being ripped out of my chest. The ‘red hats’ looked in every corner of our house while I hid under a sofa in the tea time room.

“And then, they dragged my dad out of the house and there was a voiceless silence, and then heavy bootsteps, and then car engines were all I heard.

They have no education in history, intentionally so thanks to the public schools. So, they have no idea of how civilizations collapse. But I have seen one civilization fall, and now I am seeing another. Americans forgot THE WILL OF THE PEOPLE, a united people. Even worse, they erased God.

“I realized in that very moment that my dad, who I had not seen since I was twenty-six months old when he left for America, was being taking away from me. I came out from under the sofa screaming and crying for my dad. I ran as fast as I could trying to catch up with my Dad and the madmen.

“But I was too late, Jason,” Shu says. “They were already in their black Range Rovers, driving away.

“I felt so numb, and walked back with heaviness and this wobbly feeling in my knees towards our children’s study room where we did our homework. Once I was there, I grabbed the backpack my Dad had given me and I lay down on the floor and snuggled with his backpack with my hands going over it to feel for the embroidered words: ‘THE WILL OF THE PEOPLE’. I kept trying to recall what they meant and exactly how my dad had explained them to me, and the sound of his voice as he did so.”

“My body was shivering. I was crying. I was angry. Angry that no one in my neighborhood had THE WILL OF THE PEOPLE—to save my dad. To fight off those madmen, and their boss the dictator.

“Then I got angry with myself for not having THE WILL inside of me.

“And then, I fell asleep there, angry and cuddling the backpack my dad had given me.

“Two days later, on October 21, 1988, my dad was buried.”

Shu’s words come out white-hot and her memories leap from her mind to mine as she recalls the horrors of more than thirty years before.

And then her words shift to registers of immediacy, even of impatience.

I am heading the fight against the sexualization of children,” Shu says, her voice thickening with emotion.

“I want you to understand why I’m so impassioned about the privileges and rights Americans have,” Shu continues.

“Most Americans can’t relate to my sense of urgency. But I cannot relate to their complacency. They have no education in history, intentionally so thanks to the public schools. So, they have no idea of how civilizations collapse. But I have seen one civilization fall, and now I am seeing another.

“Americans forgot THE WILL OF THE PEOPLE, a united people. Even worse, they erased God. All logical Americans should feel grave concern for the future of our nation.”

“Somalis Are Refugees Again… in America”

Over the course of an approximately hour-and-a-half phone conversation in late December, Shukri Abdirahman explains what she means about Americans having forgotten the will of the people and erased God. I cannot help but think that the picture she paints of present-day America sounds, in many ways, even more brutal than the Somalia from which Shu escaped as a little girl.

“I am heading the fight against the sexualization of children,” Shu says, her voice thickening with emotion.

“Here in Minnesota, the schools have pushed God so far out. Parents have no rights anymore, not even to know whether their children are ‘transitioning’ from gender to gender.”

Mohamed Siad Barre’s henchmen raped women and girls. Joe Biden’s henchmen are performing, and encouraging, sex-change operations on elementary schoolers.

Beginning in 2024, Minnesota will require public school “teachers” to support transgender ideology in order to get a “teaching” license in the state.

I want there to be a united front against the people who are going after our children,” Shu continues. “I want all concerned parents, no matter their religious background, to stand up. “So far, though, the Muslims are the only ones in Minnesota that I see loudly fighting the child-sexualization agenda. Christians and Jews don’t want to join us. They are afraid of being cast aside, of being denounced as ‘nationalists’.”

“I have been hosting events to let Somali groups in the area know what is going on,” Shu says. “I go to madrassas around Minnesota and the upper Midwest every Saturday to teach parents about their rights.”

Shu is a Muslim. She is working to bridge various divides so that all of her fellow Americans will join the fight for their kids.

“I want there to be a united front against the people who are going after our children,” Shu continues. “I want all concerned parents, no matter their religious background, to stand up.

“So far, though, the Muslims are the only ones in Minnesota that I see loudly fighting the child-sexualization agenda. Christians and Jews don’t want to join us. They are afraid of being cast aside, of being denounced as ‘nationalists’.”

Shu describes what parents are in for when they decide to push back against the ideological indoctrination and sexual predation being carried out against America’s youth.

“I and other Muslim parents have been called ‘Nazis’ for speaking up,” She tells me. “In Dearborn, Michigan, recently, a school board member called me a ‘Nazi’ for opposing the sexualization of our young ones. I was told that I should be mindful of the consequences that people suffered because of the Third Reich.”

To my mind, however, it is the school board members, and not the parents, who must answer for what is being done to underage Americans.

Shu says that there are several states in America which are “transgender sanctuaries,” where children may be castrated and otherwise genitally mutilated as their “teachers” encourage them in gender ideology.

They made us fearful of being Americans, of who we are, of exercising our God-given rights—the very essence of what it means to be an American. What happened in Somalia is happening here, in the USA. The so-called elites are dividing us. Half the country is brainwashed by the godless Left. They believe that we are the enemy.

“The godless schools and the Democrats who run them, and the media and most of government, have made examples of people,” Shu tells me. “They have left us feeling powerless and afraid.

“They made us fearful of being Americans, of who we are, of exercising our God-given rights—the very essence of what it means to be an American.

“What happened in Somalia is happening here, in the USA. The so-called elites are dividing us. Half the country is brainwashed by the godless Left. They believe that we are the enemy. The FBI, the DOJ, and other government agencies committed crimes for the Left. The government is completely corrupt.

“And in the face of this, the mosques have gone silent. The religious leaders of other faiths are also standing by and watching it happen.

“This is just what I saw destroy Somalia. The dictator, Barre, called his political enemies ‘nomads’, ‘illiterate’, ‘barbarians’, ‘uncivilized’, ‘a threat to your way of life’. If this sounds familiar, it’s because the Democrat elites use similar, and worse, terms to describe us.

“And the mosques were dead quiet as Somalia was overrun by a tyrant. Barre built gallows on a hilltop so he could watch his opponents suffer as they dangled at the end of a rope. The imams uttered not a word.

“And now we are in America, and the Left is worse than Barre in that they are using not only the law and the state to attack their enemies, but are also killing children with abortion and corrupting them with gender ideology and drag queens. And again the mosques, and even the synagogues and churches, are silent.”

Shu says something which shocks me so that I cannot find words to reply.

The Somali government was politically corrupt,” Shu says. “But the American elites are intentionally corrupting the entire culture. That is something new to me, something I did not see in Somalia.”

“Somalis in America are refugees again. Many are looking to escape the land that welcomed us when our homeland fell apart three decades ago.”

The New Genital Mutilators

The corruption, divisive and hate-fueling rhetoric, and political score-settling via a rotten central government police force working for just one side are all like Somalia, Shu says. So much of what she saw in the Horn of Africa she is now seeing in Washington, DC, and in Minneapolis and St. Paul.

But there is one big difference between America and Somalia, Shu emphasizes.

“The Somali government was politically corrupt,” Shu says. “But the American elites are intentionally corrupting the entire culture. That is something new to me, something I did not see in Somalia.”

Shu speaks of the Frankfurt School, the latter-day Marxists who made it their business to destroy culture when the original Marxist revolution failed to materialize. But as Chronicles editor Paul Gottfried recently pointed out, not even the Frankfurt School was in favor of transgenderism and sodomite “marriage”. The American elites have managed to outdo even the Cultural Marxists in depravity.

When Shu tells me of the push in the public schools to perform operations on the genitalia of children, I am reminded of female genital mutilation, the practice in some Muslim societies of removing a young girl’s clitoris so that she will remain chaste through adulthood. I bring up to Shu what I think is a horrific irony.

FSM 2

“Some American liberals used to denounce female genital mutilation. But now American liberals are all for it,” I say.

“Female genital mutilation is satanic,” Shu replies. “It’s barbaric. And I think it’s the opposite of what the public schools are doing to our kids.

“Female genital mutilation is done by some Muslims to prevent sexual pleasure. The transgenderists at the American public schools are mutilating kids for their own sexual gratification. And the drag queens and other deviants are grooming our children so that our children will be able to be a part of the predators’ sick sexual practices.”

What Shu says next makes me deeply regret that I spoke of female genital mutilation in the context of making a political point.

“The thing is, Jason, female genital mutilation happened to me,” Shu relates, her voice falling to almost a whisper. Across some six thousand miles of distance between Minnesota and Japan, I can feel the waves of terror wash over Shu as she recalls the day she was attacked.

The genital mutilation which American “teachers” are pushing on our children is a way to ensure that our children’s virginity, their purity of body and heart, is stolen from them as early as the children can be taken to a classroom free of their parents’ oversight. “Satan,” Shu says to me point-blank, “has taken over the American education system.”

“My parents promised me and my sisters that we would never undergo that practice,” Shu continues. “But my grandmother, the one from Ethiopia, kidnapped us. She took us out of the city, out among people who still performed the terrible thing.

“I was pinned down on a gravel road by my grandmother and another man. A second man had a knife. There was no sedation. He looked afraid to be caught.

“I kicked and screamed. I kicked for all I could kick. I threw him off balance and his knife went sideways into me, into my genital area. The mutilation wasn’t successful, but I was grievously wounded all the same.

“And it was a mercy that I was never sewn up.

“My grandmother did the same thing to my sisters. They were sewn up afterwards. When that happens, the effluvia from the wound, and then from the menses, can’t escape. It stays inside. The girl, the woman, gets septicemia. My eldest sister almost died of blood poisoning from the effects of being genitally mutilated.

“My other sister was surgically reopened right before her wedding day, but only after the prospective groom had inspected her to make sure she was still a virgin.”

In this gut-wrenching account of a brutal molestation and mutilation—not just once, but thrice, against three sisters from the same family—I catch a glimpse of what Shu means when she says that what she experienced is different from what public school “teachers” are visiting on kids in America today. Female genital mutilation is a way that some Muslims police virginity. The genital mutilation which American “teachers” are pushing on our children is a way to ensure that our children’s virginity, their purity of body and heart, is stolen from them as early as the children can be taken to a classroom free of their parents’ oversight.

“Satan,” Shu says to me point-blank, “has taken over the American education system.”

The Burden of a Godly Parent

Shu has a young son. He was only five years old when he came home from school upset by what his teacher had told him that day.

“The burden of being a Godly parent is so heavy right now,” Shu says. “Truly, the people who don’t have children have been saved. What the schools and the culture are doing to our kids is beyond belief.

“My son fell at school and had an ‘ouchy’,” Shu tells me. “He asked God to help him to be strong even though he was in pain.

I’m an American. I took an oath when I joined the United States Army. That oath doesn’t expire. I am not going to abandon my country.

“His teacher overheard him and later called him over for a private conversation. ‘The next time you have an ouchy, don’t say “God”,’ the teacher said.

“The same teacher gave my son a ‘purple rainbow’ for his birthday. At five, my son knew what a ‘gay’ is. He knows that two men or two women can be ‘married’. There is already a cross-dresser at his school. Among his classmates, I mean. A little boy who dresses like a little girl and is allowed to use the little girls’ restroom.”

Shu tells me that Somali parents are getting out of America as the culture goes to seed.

“Somalis are leaving for a sane society,” Shu says. “Those with money have already left. Some Somali fathers in America have sent their wives and children to live in Kenya or the Middle East, to a sane society where there are no cross-dressing kindergarteners or gender-pushing kindergarten teachers. Where little kids are not forbidden to say ‘God’. Where teachers are not going to arrange with ‘doctors’ to mutilate your children.

“Somalis are capitalists. We’re entrepreneurs. We don’t want welfare. We want to start businesses, to work. We can survive wherever we go.

“But I don’t have the option of leaving,” Shu continues. “My children don’t have a father at home, that’s one thing. We have our home base here.

“The other thing is that I’m an American. I took an oath when I joined the United States Army. That oath doesn’t expire. I am not going to abandon my country.”

Blackhawk Down

When Shu was in school in the United States, she learned about a movie called Blackhawk Down.

Many Americans have probably seen the 2001 film portraying a real event from October of 1993. In the movie, a Blackhawk helicopter is shot down over Mogadishu, Somalia. The crew’s efforts to battle their way out of very hostile territory form the movie’s main action.

I studied as much as I could about what happened in Somalia in 1993,” Shu tells me. “I came to understand that some Americans died for me, gave their lives so that I could be free.”

“I studied as much as I could about what happened in Somalia in 1993,” Shu tells me. “I came to understand that some Americans died for me, gave their lives so that I could be free.”

Before the movie and her subsequent study, Shu had a much more experiential understanding of the Somali civil war.

“All I knew up until I learned of Blackhawk Down was that, as we were leaving by boat to flee to Kenya, some people around us were saying that the United States military was in Somalia. That was right around the time that the Blackhawk Down events took place.”

Shu says she felt a weight on her as she learned about the Americans in Somalia in 1993. Those men’s sacrifice, she says, presented her with a choice.

“After I came to America,” She tells me, “I asked myself, why did God take those American soldiers as they protected my country, while I was walking around their country, alive and safe?

“We had sweets in the USA. In Somalia, there was war.”

The same school teacher who taught her about Blackhawk Down also taught her about the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution. Shu felt a budding calling to serve her adoptive country. During her freshman year of college at the University of Minnesota-Duluth, Shu tells me, there was a table at a career fair advertising for the military.

“I enlisted after college,” Shu says. “I wanted to give back to a country like America, that had so many sweets for children.”

America as a land of sweets is probably something most born-in-place Americans would not call to mind. But for someone with Shu’s life story, grocery stores with aisles and aisles filled with chocolate and candy must have seemed like something out of fairy tale.

“When we were in refugee camps in Kenya,” Shu says, “we had only white rice and boiled cabbage for three and a half years. We slept on the floor. When it rained, the tent we lived in flooded and there was nowhere dry to sleep. But in America, our beds were dry. They were off the floor.”

After escaping from a war-torn country only to volunteer to go to war on others’ behalf, Shu might have hoped to live a quiet and peaceful life in her new home. But that happy fate was not to be hers. “I never dreamed that I would see my beloved America suffer what it has these past few years.”

A dry bed and a candy bar in every corner shop. What lottery did I win to be born in the United States?

“I eventually deployed to Iraq with the Army. I also did special-ops and intel work in other places. I can’t speak about a lot of what I did for security reasons. But I believe I was the only female Somali in the Army at that time.”

After escaping from a war-torn country only to volunteer to go to war on others’ behalf, Shu might have hoped to live a quiet and peaceful life in her new home. But that happy fate was not to be hers.

“I never dreamed that I would see my beloved America suffer what it has these past few years.”

An “Election” and a “Vaccine”

I ask Shu when she first started to notice that the America she fought for, the America her Dad had told her about, the America she longed to see even before she had ever set foot in Minnesota as a refugee, had taken a wrong path.

“It was the so-called ‘election’ of 2020,” Shu replies. “Biden is an unelected tyrant. We do not have to pretend that he is the president. So many are covering over the truth with convenient lies. But I will not.”

But the 2020 “election” was not the only thing flash-signaling to Shu that her America was going off the rails.

At one point, a doctor came into the hospital room and started talking about getting coronavirus vaccinations. My son was being treated for the coronavirus—why did he need a vaccine? And there was no way I was going to touch that thing made from the cells of aborted children. I refused.

“In 2021, my young son was hospitalized with a COVID infection,” Shu continues. “We were at Children’s Minnesota Hospital in St. Paul.

“At one point, a doctor came into the hospital room and started talking about getting coronavirus vaccinations. My son was being treated for the coronavirus—why did he need a vaccine? And there was no way I was going to touch that thing made from the cells of aborted children. I refused.

“The doctor wouldn’t relent. The patient advocate and Child Protective Services all called me. They then descended on the hospital room. They were pressuring me to have myself and my son and other children vaccinated.”

At the time, Shu was in medical school, working toward a degree in adolescent psychiatry. But the doctors and other officials were talking down to her, she says, as though she were ignorant.

“I realized, in that hospital room,” Shu says, “that I could not even be a mother in the USA any longer.

“I called my imam. I had my own patient advocate come into the room. And then I told the doctor and the Child Protective Services person and the hospital’s ‘patient advocate’ to sit and listen to a lecture from my side.

“They eventually backed down.”

“Good for you,” I say. “Good for you for standing up.”

But that was not the end of Shu’s fight against the “election”-“vaccine” regime. She decided to run for office as a way to take her country back. Shu says she was attacked not only by the Democrats, which she expected, but also by so-called conservatives as well.

We have no good options in politics. And nowhere to go. To our south are cartels, to our north is a tyrant in blackface. We stand and fight. Because the fight is right now, and right here.”

“That really hurt,” Shu says. “The Left called me a terrorist, a token minority—all of that ran right off my back. I expected it from them. But to the Republicans I had to prove that I wasn’t my opponent, Ilhan Omar.

“Some other veterans and current military members stood up for me,” Shu continues.

“But it went on. Some conservative think-tanks tried pigeonholing me as part of a Muslim turn to the Republican Party. I tangled with Jihad Watch. Everyone thought they knew who I was.

“Nobody asked me, though. They just assumed. I had to fight on multiple fronts just to have my voice heard.

“I blame the Republicans and the Democrats for what has happened to America,” Shu continues. “Many Republicans in office vote with the Democrats. Republicans help the Democrats—it’s a uniparty. The Left are blatantly about hate, cheating, abortion. The Republicans, though, they make a show of opposing the Democrats, but in the end they play along.

“We have no good options in politics. And nowhere to go. To our south are cartels, to our north is a tyrant in blackface. We stand and fight. Because the fight is right now, and right here.”

Shu speaks with the wisdom of someone who has seen evil and not given in to it. She knows that countries can fall to pieces. She is telling anyone who will listen that the Somalia of yesteryear is the America of today.

“Still I cannot wake up American conservatives,” Shu says. “They are living in la-la land. They think it can’t happen here. But it is. Right now. Trump will be jailed. Then his supporters. It’s already happening.

A united people under God is the only way to resuscitate our country. A divided people under tyranny will be its death.

“As a veteran I am heartbroken. America is not what it once was. Why can’t so many Americans see it?

“And why don’t the ones who do see it do something about it?”

“I Fear God More Than Man”

“America is on life support today,” Shu says. “The Constitution is shredded. The Bill of Rights is dead.”

Shu ends our communication with a call to action, and to return to God.

“A united people under God is the only way to resuscitate our country. A divided people under tyranny will be its death.

“At this critical moment in our nation’s history, the citizenry must recall how this great country was conceived.

“America was conceived as ‘one nation, under God’. It was founded by the will of the people—a united people—with a devout, unquenchable love for God and country in their hearts.

“This citizenry did not back down in the face of any tyrannical force. As a united people, they didn’t tolerate tyrants anywhere. Especially not in America. As a united people, they fought them. As a united people, they conquered them.

“Somalia once had the will of the people—a united people. We were colonized by five different colonial European empires. But we stood up united against the colonial empires. And the will of the people prevailed.

“And Somalia become one nation. The five corners of the star in Somalia’s flag signify that. It’s known as the Star of Unity.

The Siad Barre regime, the regime of the dictator that killed my dad, deliberately pitted the people against one other, playing to tribal factionalism. In the end, it was exactly like it is now in America. The people were divided and weaponized against each other.

“But over time, tyranny and dictatorship creeped in, just like in America now.

“The Siad Barre regime, the regime of the dictator that killed my dad, deliberately pitted the people against one other, playing to tribal factionalism.

“In the end, it was exactly like it is now in America. The people were divided and weaponized against each other.

“And the will of the people was no more because there was no unity. One day, it all blew up into a civil war.

“What I went through during that time, and then escaping the hell and horrors of the war… there are so many things I still can’t bring myself to recall or speak about.

But I will keep fighting. Truly,” Shu says with a level resolve, “I fear tyranny more than death. I fear God more than man.”

“And now, a new tyrant emerges in the land to which I fled. I am not OK with that. The Declaration of Independence tells us that we do not have to tolerate tyranny. We have a criminal administration propped up by a lying press and a debauched, predatory elite. Either we stand up now and say enough is enough, or we lose our freedoms forever.

“And if that happens, if America slips into civil war like Somalia once did, there will be blood in the streets like no one has ever seen. There will be no mercy.

“I pray for America. Everyone must pray for America too.

“But I will keep fighting. Truly,” Shu says with a level resolve, “I fear tyranny more than death. I fear God more than man.”

--Jason Morgan is associate professor at Reitaku University in Kashiwa, Japan

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Last modified on Friday, January 20, 2023
Jason Morgan | Remnant Correspondent, TOKYO

Jason Morgan is an associate professor at Reitaku University in Chiba, Japan, where he teaches language, history, and philosophy. He specializes in Japanese legal history. He’s published four books in Japanese and two book-length Japanese-to-English translations. His work has also appeared at Japan Forward, New Oxford Review, Crisis, Modern Age, University BookmanChronicles, and Clarion Review.